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Synkavite
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Synkavite Brand names, Synkavite Analogs

Synkavite Brand Names Mixture

  • No information avaliable

Synkavite Chemical_Formula

C11H8O2

Synkavite RX_link

No information avaliable

Synkavite fda sheet

Synkavite msds (material safety sheet)

http://ptcl.chem.ox.ac.uk/MSDS/ME/menadione.html

Synkavite Synthesis Reference

No information avaliable

Synkavite Molecular Weight

172.183 g/mol

Synkavite Melting Point

102 oC

Synkavite H2O Solubility

Insoluble

Synkavite State

Solid

Synkavite LogP

1.758

Synkavite Dosage Forms

Tablets (5mg) and injection (5, 10, 37.5 mg/ml)

Synkavite Indication

The primary known function of vitamin K is to assist in the normal clotting of blood, but it may also play a role in normal bone calcification.

Synkavite Pharmacology

Menadione is a fat-soluble vitamin precursor that is converted into menaquinone in the liver. Vitamin K1 and K2 are the naturally occurring types of vitamin K. The former, which is also known as phylloquinone, is synthesized by plants and can be found in such foods as spinach, broccoli, lettuce, and soybeans. The latter, sometimes alternatively referred to as menaquinone, is primarily produced by bacteria in the anterior part of the gut and the intestines. Vitamin K3, on the other hand, is one of the many manmade versions of vitamin K. Also called menadione, this yellowish, synthetic crystalline substance is converted into the active form of the K2 vitamin inside of the animal body. While a vitamin K deficiency can be dangerous, especially to infants that may easily suffer from extensive hemorrhaging, an overdose can be as equally detrimental. Newborns that are administered too great a dosage of vitamin K3 can suffer from kernicterus, a form of severe brain damage that may produce decreased movement, loss of appetite, seizures, deafness, mental retardation, and even death. This condition is associated with an abnormally high concentration of bilirubin, a bile pigment, in the tissues of the brain, which can be caused by the presence of K3. For this reason, K3 is less often utilized medically than it was in former times.

Synkavite Absorption

Variable and ranges from 10% to 80%

Synkavite side effects and Toxicity

Menadione (vitamin K3), which is not used as a nutritional supplemental form of vitamin K for humans, has been reported to cause adverse reactions, including hemolytic anemia. Large doses have also been reported to cause brain damage.

Synkavite Patient Information

No information avaliable

Synkavite Organisms Affected

Humans and other mammals